Elizabeth (jacka) lewis

                             Elizabeth (jacka) lewis

The photographs here relate to Chapter 14 of The Complete History and were kindly sent by Wendy Walker and previously collected by Russell Stewart. They have assembled an extensive genealogy for the descendants of Samuel Jacka, father of William Jacka Snr. Russell is descended from Joseph Jacka (1838 – 1911), son of William Snr, through Joseph’s daughter, Mary Maria and her daughter with Albert Stevens, Ilene Annie. Wendy is descended from Mary Lilla Jane Jacka, daughter of William Jacka Jnr through Lilla's daughter Rose Florence.

Photographs of Elizabeth (Jacka) Lewis and the family of her eldest daughter, Catherine (Giles) Smith  

Elizabeth Jacka (1827 – 1914) was William Jnr’s older sister. Her relationships with three men, including marriages to John Giles and later, Henry Lewis, are described on pp. 249 – 252 of the book. The photo of a stoic-looking Elizabeth was taken in 1913 in Melbourne when she would have been aged 85 or 86 – about a year before her death.

The second photo (below) is of the family of Elizabeth’s eldest daughter, Catherine Giles (1857 – 1923), the only child from Elizabeth’s marriage to miller, John Giles. This marriage was cut short by John’s death from tuberculosis. Catherine married Thomas Smith in Adelaide in 1879 and the family moved to Melbourne in about 1884. The photograph, taken in Melbourne about 1908, shows Catherine and Thomas with all their surviving children (familiar names and approximate ages in parentheses).

 Back:  Robert (21), Thomas (27), James (Jim, 25), Henry (Harry, 23). Front:  Elizabeth (Bessie, 12), Catherine (28), Thomas Smith (65), Catherine (61), Joseph (Joe, 14).

Back:  Robert (21), Thomas (27), James (Jim, 25), Henry (Harry, 23). Front:  Elizabeth (Bessie, 12), Catherine (28), Thomas Smith (65), Catherine (61), Joseph (Joe, 14).

 

Photographs of Joseph Jacka’s family, including wife Annie (Kent) and son, Private Arthur Robert Jacka

                        annie jacka nee kent

                       annie jacka nee kent

 

 

The photograph on the right shows Joseph’s wife, Annie (Kent) (1845 – 1916) in Adelaide. It is not known when this was taken but may have been sometime in the 1880s or 90s.

 

 Back row: Ida May (Jacka) King holding Charles William King, Robert Arthur Kent Jacka, Rose Victoria Jacka, Samuel Hall Jacka, possibly holding son Clarence Samuel. Middle row: a daughter of Samuel Hall Jacka, Annie (Kent) holding Mavis Ida Jacka, daughter of Samuel, Lenard Roy Stevens, Mary Maria (Jacka) Stevens holding daughter Ilene Annie. Front row: another Samuel daughter, Stanley Albert Stevens, then two more grandchildren, possibly Edna May King and Evelyn Rose Jacka.

Back row: Ida May (Jacka) King holding Charles William King, Robert Arthur Kent Jacka, Rose Victoria Jacka, Samuel Hall Jacka, possibly holding son Clarence Samuel. Middle row: a daughter of Samuel Hall Jacka, Annie (Kent) holding Mavis Ida Jacka, daughter of Samuel, Lenard Roy Stevens, Mary Maria (Jacka) Stevens holding daughter Ilene Annie. Front row: another Samuel daughter, Stanley Albert Stevens, then two more grandchildren, possibly Edna May King and Evelyn Rose Jacka.

The photo below, taken in Adelaide in late 1915 (possibly before son Robert Arthur departed for service in Egypt) shows Annie about a year before her death with some of her children and grandchildren. Joseph had died in 1911. The identity of some of the children is uncertain.

 

 

 

Robert Arthur Kent Jacka enlisted (as Arthur Robert Jacka) in September 1915 at age 29. His service record shows that he was 5 ft 5in, 138 pounds, with dark complexion and hair and hazel eyes. He had been a blacksmith, labourer and station hand before enlisting. A private throughout the war, he was initially assigned to the Australian Imperial Forces 2nd Reinforcements 1st Remount Unit and sent to Egypt where he spent much of the war associated with the 2nd Light Horse as part of the Field Ambulance or on headquarters staff at the “Details” Camp, Moascar, east of Cairo. This camp, run by the Australian Army Medical Corp was a place for holding and training soldiers until they were sent back to the front. Robert Jacka was eventually invalided back to Australia in early 1919 with a diagnosis of “debility”, seemingly a catch-all term for weakness, fatigue and inability to perform duties. Robert, like many others, contracted venereal disease soon after arriving in Cairo in 1916 and was in and out of hospitals around Egypt for much of his four years there. So that may have contributed to his debility. He said he planned to assist his blacksmith brother after leaving the army.